GridLight: Hello World Game Guide

Set up for your GridLight: Hello World activity for Hour of Code™ in three simple steps.

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[ 1 ] SIGN UP FOR HOUR OF CODE

  • Register your Hour of Code event

  • Computer Science Education Week is December 3 - 9, 2018!

[ 2 ] LOAD THE GAME

  • Load www.botschool.io/hoc on your computer browser (Chrome recommended!)

  • Once the game is loaded in your browser, you don’t have to be connected to the internet to play

  • If you have any hiccups, just reload the page while connected to the internet

[ 3 ] START PLAYING!

  • The activity is self-guided — the first few levels ease players into how to play

  • We highly recommend you run through the experience at least once in advance

  • We also have a Certificate of Completion you can print

That’s it, you’re ready to go!

Want a deeper dive? Scroll down for more info.


MISSION COMPLETE?

Print out a certificate with Root and your Bot Friend Nab!

There are spots to write in the player’s name and to jot how many Light Sprites, Null and Bugged Bots, and Light Bits were collected.

Click on an image to download a certificate of your Nab, or hit “Download All Certificates” to get a PDF with all four certificates.


GridLight: Hello World is a short, hour-long activity the Bot School team built to support the Hour of Code initiative.

It’s an introductory slice of the full GridLight game that is currently in early development. Follow along on our journey!

We’re iterating on the game and would love your feedback. Got a minute to tell us your thoughts?


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GridLight: Hello World introduces coding fundamentals — sequencing & loops.

We integrated these coding principles directly into the gameplay, so even those completely new to computer science can experience that it’s fun, creative, and accessible.

Through playing, you'll put these K-12 Computer Science Framework concepts into practice:

> Algorithms and Programming — learn this every turn by structuring your Command Line sequence

> Computing Systems — shown by the relationship between software (the Command Line) and hardware (your Bot friend)

> Impacts of Computing — use programming to solve a challenge (restoring the Lighthouse for the Festival)


  THE STORY   You're preparing for the Lighthouse Festival with the help of your mentor,  Root .  At first, the mission seems simple -- gather up  Light Sprites ! They are powerful, magical critters that can restore the  Lighthouse Orb  with  GridLight , an energy source. Root introduces you to the magic of coding, by showing you how to program  Nab , the  Bot Friend  you’ll rely on to complete the mission.  Then  Wild Bots  start to appear on the map. Wild Bots aren’t uncommon, but it’s strange to see so many of them either broken ( Null Bots ) or grumpy and trying to attack ( Bugged Bots ). Not only are they cluttering things up, they’re scaring away the Light Sprites!  You and Root eventually discover the source of Null Bots and Bugged Bots. A fellow programmer had written code to automate the gathering of Light Sprites, but in his hurry to ship it out, he didn’t test the code nor did he have it reviewed by a peer. His code produced a bug that made the Wild Bots treat everything with a different protocol as an enemy.  You disable the device broadcasting the code to Wild Bots. Root says she will bring the bug report back to the other programmer. Both of you make plans to return for the  Lighthouse Festival  that night -- where you see the Light Sprites restore the Lighthouse Orb.

THE STORY

You're preparing for the Lighthouse Festival with the help of your mentor, Root.

At first, the mission seems simple -- gather up Light Sprites! They are powerful, magical critters that can restore the Lighthouse Orb with GridLight, an energy source. Root introduces you to the magic of coding, by showing you how to program Nab, the Bot Friend you’ll rely on to complete the mission.

Then Wild Bots start to appear on the map. Wild Bots aren’t uncommon, but it’s strange to see so many of them either broken (Null Bots) or grumpy and trying to attack (Bugged Bots). Not only are they cluttering things up, they’re scaring away the Light Sprites!

You and Root eventually discover the source of Null Bots and Bugged Bots. A fellow programmer had written code to automate the gathering of Light Sprites, but in his hurry to ship it out, he didn’t test the code nor did he have it reviewed by a peer. His code produced a bug that made the Wild Bots treat everything with a different protocol as an enemy.

You disable the device broadcasting the code to Wild Bots. Root says she will bring the bug report back to the other programmer. Both of you make plans to return for the Lighthouse Festival that night -- where you see the Light Sprites restore the Lighthouse Orb.


NEED A HANDY REFERENCE? Here’s A Game board Diagram!


The 'Hour of Code' is a nationwide initiative by Computer Science Education Week and Code.org to introduce millions of students to one hour of computer science and computer programming.